Important Ethical Practices in the Recruiting Process

Craig Stocksleger is the owner of Comprehensive Recruiting, an Arizona-based firm that focuses on placing capital markets professionals in executive positions within financial companies. With nearly 15 years of experience, Craig Stocksleger has also trained many employees in best practices for recruiting qualified, executive-level candidates for companies in the financial sector. When seeking professionals to fill positions, it is important for recruiters to adhere to the following ethical practices in order to maintain integrity and promote the success of their clients.

1. An ethical recruiter does not attempt to place candidates where they are unsuitable. Though firms aim to put adequate candidates in jobs as quickly as possible, an ethical recruiter should not utilize unethical practices such as redirection in order to convince a hiring manager that his or her qualms about a candidate are unfounded. Instead, a recruiter should listen to client concerns, and seek to provide a candidate that satisfactorily meets client needs.

2. An ethical recruiter does not misrepresent himself in order to obtain resumes. Using a practice known as “rusing,” unethical recruiters will claim to be legal professionals, family members, or members of the press in order to persuade a potential candidate to speak with them, and promptly drop the ruse to talk business as soon as the candidate agrees to speak with them. Honest recruiters make contact with discretion, but are transparent about their identities.

3. An ethical recruiter does not fabricate job descriptions in order to collect resumes. Unethical recruiters often accumulate the resumes of potential job candidates by contacting these individuals with fake job descriptions, and later tell them the position has been filled. A good recruiter contacts professionals with tangible job offers only.

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